From the Archives: E.S. King Village Turns 50

May 13, 2010
By Cherry Crayton
E.S. King Village in 1960. (Photo courtesy of Special Collections, NCSU Libraries)

E.S. King Village in 1960. (Photo courtesy of Special Collections, NCSU Libraries)

NC State will celebrate the 50th anniversary of E.S. King Village this afternoon. Here are  five facts about the housing community for married students located on the west side of campus:

  • It was built in 1959.
  • It was originally called the Married Student Housing Development.
  • It consists of 17 buildings and 295 apartments.
  • When it opened, there were about 1,585 students at NC State who were married —  one-fourth of the student body.
  • It was renamed for Edward S. King, general secretary of the YMCA from 1919 to 1959,  in the 1970s.

Did you live in E.S. King Village? If so, share your memories of living there by leaving a comment. Two more photos from the housing community are after the jump.

A couple and their son in a two-room apartment in E.S. King Village in the early 1960s. (Photo courtesy of Special Collections, NCSU Libraries)

A couple and their son in a two-room apartment in E.S. King Village in the early 1960s. (Photo courtesy of Special Collections, NCSU Libraries)

Children on the playground at E.S. King Village in 1974. (Photo courtesy of Special Collections, NCSU Libraries)

Children on the playground at E.S. King Village in 1974. (Photo courtesy of Special Collections, NCSU Libraries)

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2 Responses to “From the Archives: E.S. King Village Turns 50”

  1. Dee Shore says:

    The apartments are cramped and nothing more than functional, but I loved living in the E.S. King Village in the early 1980s. My husband was a community adviser there while he was a student, and we made friends young and old from around the world. Our son spent many, many days on the playground there. What great memories!

  2. Alan Pan says:

    Most married students who applied for an apartment at King Village had to stay on a waiting list for 6-12 months in the late 1980’s. I was a community advisor and a resident back then. One thing that I learned as a CA is cultural awareness. Later in my career as an executive of a large international company I benefited from the use of that ability to appreciate the diversity of people’s background, accommodate their ways of thinking, and gain mutual respect. King Village has played a wonderful role in hosting student families, from domestic and international. It has also provided a wonderful place for cultural exchanges through social activities. Thank you, King Village!

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